IMAGES From Nostalgiaville
VERMONT-
BENNINGTON, VT- 8/09/05

NOTE: A Click of your Mouse on most of the pictures will enlarge them for better viewing

BENNINGTON,

VERMONT

 

A MOOSE INVASION of BENNINGTON

All roads in Bennington lead to the Moose...

 

HISTORY... BENNINGTON, VERMONT

BENNINGTON BATTLE MONUMENT
On August 16, 1777, British forces sent by General Burgoyne to seize supplies at Bennington were turned back by New Englanders under General John Stark and Vermont's Colonel Seth Warner.  This 306 foot commemorative shaft planned 100 years later, was dedicated in 1891.  In 1953 it was taken over, restored and an elevator installed by the Vermont Historic Sites Commission which now administers it for the State.

Bennington Battle Monument Gift Shop

On this site stood the Continental Storehouse object of the British attack that was repulsed by the Colonial forces at the Battle of Bennington August 16, 1777

The expedition led by Lieutenant Colonel Baum, sent to seize military stores here, was defeated by volunteer American militia forces from New Hampshire, Massachusetts and Vermont commanded by General John Stark, aided by Colonels Warner and Herrick of Vermont, Symonds of Massachusetts and Nichols of New Hampshire.

ANTHONY HASWELL (1756 - 1816)
Editor and publisher The Vermont Gazette, Bennington.  Uncompromising in defense of freedom of the press.  Imprisoned in 1800 for opposition to alien and sedition laws as threats to the newborn democracy.  Erected in 1942 on site of first printing press of Vermont Gazette by Sigma Delta Chi National Professional Journalistic Fraternity.

BRIGADIER GENERAL JOHN STARK (1728 - 1822)
Victor of the Battle at Bennington, 1777.  Design by John Rogers - 1889.  Sculpture by Robert Shure.  Gift of John Brooks Threlfall, 1999.
"There they are boys!
We beat them today
Or Molly Stark sleeps
A widow tonight!"

NEW HAMPSHIRE AT THE BATTLE OF BENNINGTON
Erected in honor of Brigadier General John Stark and the 1400 New Hampshire men who came to the defense of Vermont in August 1777.  Assembling at Fort Number Four in Charleston, New Hampshire.  Stark and his troops crossed the Green Mountains to aid in the defense of the newly established state of Vermont.  As the Commander in Chief of all the American forces from New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts and New York. 
General Stark had approximately 2000 men in all in the first phase of the battle General Stark's army defeated and captured a British detachment led by Lieutenant Colonel Friedrich Baum.  Shortly after this triumph with the timely assistance of Colonel Seth Warner and his "Green Mountain Boys."  A relief column under Colonel Heinrich Von Breymann was repulsed by this denying the enemy sorely needed supplies these twin victories near Bennington on August 16, 1777.  Contributed notably to the total British Surrender at Saratoga two months later and to the subsequent military alliance with France the turning point in the war for American independence.

Colonial Warner with the Green Mountain Boys won a decisive victory over the British Reinforcements in the second engagement at Bennington, August 16, 1777.  Thus saving the military stores at that place crippling Burcoyne's Army so as to stop his invading march and establishing a turning point in the War of the American Revolution.
An able statesman and soldier, he assisted the people of Vermont to establish their independence and to organize an independent state government under which they existed for a period of 14 years when the state was admitted to the Federal Union, and during the Revolutionary War aided the 13 colonies in acquiring their independence.

THE "CORKSCREW" RAILROAD
When wealthy North Bennington resident Trenor Park purchased the Bennington-Rutland Railroad, he found that the railroad "barons" of the Troy and Boston Railroad refused him access to their New York lines.  Rather than fight this monopoly, Park built a rail line from Bennington to Lebanon Spring, NY where he could transfer his trains to southbound rails while bypassing Troy.  The dozens of tight turns over 40 miles of hilly terrain gave this stretch of railroad the name "Corkscrew."  Passenger service was canceled in 1931 and the line was officially abandoned in 1953.  Remnants of the old rail bed can be seen where it crossed the highway at this point.

 

DOWN TOWN in BENNINGTON, VERMONT (As seen by the Camera on 8-09-05)

BENNINGTON COUNTY COURTHOUSE BENNINGTON FREE LIBRARY TOWN OFFICES
bennin8.jpg (32054 bytes) BLACKSMITH SHOP
c. 1844  Blacksmith and wagon shop until 1912.  Adapt ably reused for many purposes including the Bennington Girls Club and Bennington Police Station.  National Register Historic District.

BLACKSMITH SHOP

TOWN OFFICES
c. 1844.  Henry G Root homestead transferred to town by his descendents for municipal purposes in 1920.  National Register Historic District.

TOWN OFFICES

BENNINGTON MUSEUM
  EVAN'S NEWS VERMONT MILLS PROPERTIES OTHER DOWN TOWN BUILDINGS

 

HISTORIC CHURCHES in BENNINGTON, VERMONT

SACRED HEART FRANCIS de SALES ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH

ST PETERS EPISCOPAL CHURCH
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

 

The PARKS in BENNINGTON, VERMONT

BENNINGTON PATHWAY

 

SIGNS to Remember in BENNINGTON, VERMONT

 

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